Story Behind the Book : Volume 1 (Essays on Writing Speculative Fiction)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Story Behind the Book : Volume 1 (Essays on Writing Speculative Fiction) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Story Behind the Book : Volume 1 (Essays on Writing Speculative Fiction) book. Happy reading Story Behind the Book : Volume 1 (Essays on Writing Speculative Fiction) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Story Behind the Book : Volume 1 (Essays on Writing Speculative Fiction) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Story Behind the Book : Volume 1 (Essays on Writing Speculative Fiction) Pocket Guide.

Barnes Goodreads Author. Lisa Jensen Goodreads Author. Essays cover everything from getting an initial creative burst, worldbuilding, tackling writer's block, to the final process of publication. Some of the essays are personal, some rather technical but a "Story Behind the Book : Volume 1" collects nearly 40 non-fiction essays on writing and editing speculative fiction written by some of the most exciting authors and editors. Some of the essays are personal, some rather technical but all of them, without an exception, provide an unique and fascinating insight into the mind of an author.

Modesitt Jr. Tallis, Ian R. All proceeds will be donated to Epilepsy Action. Get A Copy. Paperback , 74 pages. More Details Other Editions 1. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Story Behind the Book , please sign up. How long is each section about the book? See 1 question about Story Behind the Book …. This was fascinating. I really enjoy reading Lewis, however the only drawback to this volume in particular is that all of the essays in this book can be found in the compilation entitled: On Stories.

This being said, I will say that the short stories and some of the incomplete work located in this volume were utterly sensational. Had the last story been finished in particular I have no doubt that it would fly off of the shelves. Lewis was many things: a scholar, a poet, and an apologist, b This was fascinating. Lewis was many things: a scholar, a poet, and an apologist, but he was also a gifted storyteller.

We see proof of this in his famous Narnia and the Space Trilogy and we definitely see that in that volume. Whoever runs CSL's estate is obviously scraping the bottom of the barrel, at this point. Nov 17, Amanda G. Stevens rated it really liked it. However, this one was published first, so four stars it is. Given that C.

Lewis wrote a good number of the books which were instrumental in shaping my expectations for fantastical fiction, I was very interested to read his thoughts on that sort of writing. The book suffered a bit from repetition between a few of the individual essays, and I disagreed with Lewis on some points, but I highlighted a lot of stuff, and generally appreciated his insights on writers and readers.

I also enjoyed the short stories at the end of the book - Forms of Things Unknown had a particularly great twist ending. It was great to read Lewis' thoughts on the writing of science fiction, a genre that is so dear to my heart and yet so abused by many. It's also helpful to hear someone set out the purpose of the genre, and why stories themselves are so important, as opposed to simply trying to get a "moral" across. The previously unpublished stories at the end will be delightful gems for any fan of his fiction.

Oct 23, Shawn Gearhart rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed Lewis' thoughts on fairy tales and children's stories. I will definitely read those essays again. I liked the first two-thirds of the book thoughts and essays more than the last third short stories. The short stories were a bit strange to me, though this is a book "Of Other Worlds" so I guess that was to be expected.

This is an odd collection. Here you have essays and short stories some complete, other incomplete some interesting writing, some good writing and one pathetically bad short story about a prostitution ring in space Mostly it's my own personal taste. Nov 30, Ben Perley rated it really liked it. Jun 18, Margo Berendsen rated it it was amazing Shelves: reads , great-nonfiction , christian-growth , fairy-tales-and-myths.

See a Problem?

This collection is divided into essays and short stories by C. Lewis having to do primarily with fantasy, fairy tales and science fiction. The essays are classic C. Lewis, chock full of thoughts that made me stop and read them twice, stop to think about, stop to marvel over. One of the short stories, The Shoddy Lands, took me by surprise at the end and the last line in particular gave me a delicious chill; the other short stories I did not care for perhaps because they were incomplete or fi This collection is divided into essays and short stories by C.

One of the short stories, The Shoddy Lands, took me by surprise at the end and the last line in particular gave me a delicious chill; the other short stories I did not care for perhaps because they were incomplete or first drafts, which Lewis himself had never published.

I highlighted so much in the essays. I don't have time to share them all, though I wish I did. I'm trying to pick just one representative quote from each essay. The essay "On Stories" is Lewis' musings on the art of story and its deeper meaning. Shall I be thought whimsical if, in conclusion, I suggeest that this internal tension in the heart of every story between the theme and the plot constitutes, after all, its chief resemblance to life?

Of Other Worlds: Essays and Stories

If Story fails in that way does not life commit the same blunder? In real life, as in a story, something must happen. That is just the trouble. We grasp at a state and find only a sucession of events in which the state is never quite embodied. The grand idea of finding Atlantis which stirs us in the first chapter of the adventure story is apt to be frittered away in mere exciement when the journey has once been begun. But so, in real life, the idea of adventure fades when the day-to-day details begin to happen. Nor is this merely because actual hardship and danger shoulder it aside.

Other grand ideas - homecoming, reunion with a beloved - similarly elude our grasp In life and art both, as it seems to me, we are always trying to catch in our net of successive moments something that is not successive. Whether in real life there is any doctor who can teach us how to do it, so that at the last either the meshes will become fine enough to hold the bird, or we be so changed that we can throw our nets away and follow the bird to its own country, is not a question for this essay. But I think it is sometimes done - or very, very nearly done - in stories. In the essay On Science Fiction, Lewis breaks down works of science fiction into at least 5 or 6 categories, and points out weaknesses and pitfalls that occur in each category but also the strengths.

Here's his thoughts on the type of science fiction that seems to have impressed him most: If good novels are coments on life, good stories of this sort which are very much rarer are actual additions to life; they give, like certain rare dreams, sensations we never had before, and enlarge our conception of the range of possible experience Then C. Lewis gives a list of which books he feels "make the grade" and I'm including them here because if they make Lewis's grade, then I'm curious about them and adding them to my to-read list.

Also Mervyn Peake's Titus Groan. Some of Ray Bradbury's stories perhaps make the grade I am not sure that anyone has satisfactorily explained the keen, lasting, and solemn pleasure which such stories can give. The two phenomena, taken together, should at least dispose of the theory that it is something trivial. It would seem from the reactions it produces, that the mythopoeic is rather, for good or ill, a mode of imagination which does something to us at a deep level. If some seem to go to it in almost compulsive need, others seem to be in terror of what they may meet there.

May 05, Curtis rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Literary Critics. Shelves: collection , essays , criticism , mythgard. I have not read all of the pieces in this book, but what I've read is fantastic. I will make some comments about the pieces I most enjoyed, and list some quotations from each. Lewis describes the two different ways in which stories are enjoyed by different people, which is really a distinctio I have not read all of the pieces in this book, but what I've read is fantastic. Lewis describes the two different ways in which stories are enjoyed by different people, which is really a distinction of the people and not the stories themselves: Through "excitement" or through the greater atmosphere created by the story.

He prefers the latter. A few great quotes, completely out of context: After describing a scene from Last of the Mohicans "Dangers, of course, there must be: how else can you keep a story going? But they must The 'Redskinnery' was what really mattered. The story does what no theorem can quite do. Some more discontextual quotations: "I think fatuous praise from a manifest fool may hurt more than any depreciation. I was immensely intrigued with the idea of Helen's fading beauty, and it inspired me to write a rather poorly constructed song called "Yellow-haired Man," which I still melancholically sing in my echoing boudoir from time to time.

Mar 07, Meg Morden rated it it was amazing Shelves: artists-and-writers , books-about-books , essays , non-fiction , fantasy. Excellent series of essays on writing.


  1. Bloß keine Maultaschen (German Edition).
  2. Le chant des secrets (Roman étranger t. 165) (French Edition);
  3. NPR’s Book Concierge?
  4. L. E. Modesitt Jr. bibliography - Wikipedia.

The three short stories were great especially the one seen from the interior of a dull person This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. So this book actually really, really disappointed me, but only because of the fiction at the end. All of the essays are gorgeous.

They remain incredibly relevant today and I think address why young adult fiction is just as popular among adults as their intended audience. Lewis speaks eloquently about how to write for children in a way that isn't condescending and also discusses why fantasy is important and why people who don't like a certain kind of fiction have no business criticizing things th So this book actually really, really disappointed me, but only because of the fiction at the end.

Lewis speaks eloquently about how to write for children in a way that isn't condescending and also discusses why fantasy is important and why people who don't like a certain kind of fiction have no business criticizing things that fall into that category. All in all, his essays were insightful, interesting, and their truthfulness resonated powerfully.

That said, the fiction at the end read like a slap in the face in comparison to the beautiful arguments I had just been squealing about to everyone who would listen to me. Dude is sexist as hell.

Navigation menu

Literally every single one of the short pieces of fiction painted women as vain or mysteriously threatening. Just the way that he talks about women is seriously disturbing because their value is entirely in the eye of their male beholder. In the first story, "The Shoddy Lands", the main character somehow finds himself inside his friend's girlfriend's mind, who he, upon first seeing, deems "neither very pretty nor very plain".

What could have been an interesting concept of exploring what happens inside another person's mind instead winds up being a portrait of a vapid, shallow girl who only ever pays attention to clothes, jewelery and men's faces. He also is careful to give himself plenty of space to again critique the poor girl's appearance and tells us that he would never ever want to marry such a creature.

A similar theme runs throughout the other stories. In "Ministering Angels" Lewis lets us know that not all men are horndogs. In fact, there are quite a few that would rather die than sleep with frigid or fat women. In "Forms of Things Unknown", an invisible evil lurks on the moon, presumably killing every astronaut who goes up. At the end, lo and behold, it is a long-haired something that is most likely a woman.

And her value was evidently only in her beauty. Now, I realize that Helen had a reputation as the most beautiful woman in the world, but if that was truly the only thing that Agamemnon liked about her Luckily for everyone involved, it turns out that Ugly Helen wasn't actually Helen. I didn't think it was possible, Mr.

Displaying items by tag: Story Behind the Book - wisolyvahode.tk

Lewis, but you have dropped several notches in my book. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Readers also enjoyed. Short Stories.

Our Guide To 2017’s Great Reads

Her next novel, Tooth and Claw was intended as a novel Anthony Trollope could have written, but about dragons rather than humans. Farthing was her first science fiction novel, placing the genre of the "cozy" mystery firmly inside an alternate history in which the United Kingdom made peace with Adolf Hitler before the involvement of the United States in World War II.

A sequel, Ha'penny , was published in October by Tor Books , [10] with the final book in the trilogy, Half a Crown , published in September In April , Howard V.


  • Business Ideas for Caribbean Entrepreneurs.
  • The Rise of Science Fiction from Pulp Mags to Cyberpunk - Electric Literature!
  • Of Other Worlds: Essays and Stories by C.S. Lewis.
  • Literature After Darwin: Human Beasts in Western Fiction 1859-1939 (Palgrave Studies in Nineteenth-Century Writing and Culture)!
  • Jo Walton - Wikipedia?
  • Story Behind the Book : Volume 4 - Essays on Writing & Editing Fiction.
  • Hendrix stated that professional writers should never release their writings online for free, as this made them equivalent to scabs. In , Walton began writing a column for Tor. Walton moved to Montreal , Quebec , Canada, after her first novel was published. She is married to Ireland-born Dr. Emmet A. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For those of a similar name, see Jo L. Walton and Joe Walton disambiguation. This list is incomplete ; you can help by expanding it. Western Mail. Retrieved



admin