How to Stop Sucking

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Stop Sucking and Be Awesome Instead: A Three Step Process

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Over time, increasing nu Jeff Atwood began the Coding Horror blog in , and is convinced that it changed his life. Over time, increasing numbers of blog visitors found the posts helpful, relevant and interesting. Now, approximately , readers visit the blog per day and nearly as many comment and interact on the site. Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages. More Details Other Editions 1.


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    Adult Thumb Sucking: How to Break the Habit

    Jan 24, Alexander Tomislav rated it really liked it Shelves: , compsci , non-fiction , tech , The book is a compilation of the best posts from the Coding Horror blog, and got my attention from several recommendations for developers I ran into. I've also read several blog posts there and was happy to get a book with the most popular posts in a book form. As the book is a compilation of blog posts, it's a collection of essays, organized in several sections How to suck less, Programming, Web Design Principles, Testing, Know your user, Causes we should care about, Gaming and Things to read The book is a compilation of the best posts from the Coding Horror blog, and got my attention from several recommendations for developers I ran into.

    As the book is a compilation of blog posts, it's a collection of essays, organized in several sections How to suck less, Programming, Web Design Principles, Testing, Know your user, Causes we should care about, Gaming and Things to read which contain the chapters, organized by the common theme. The goof off time is important, and it wasn't invented by Google, apparently HP was the first known company to have a certain time off for their employees to play, invent and innovate. However, it only works if there's some slack in the schedule, if daydreaming and experimentation are allowed.

    The section about programming has a number of insights and advice to programmers looking to get better.

    Thumb Sucking and Finger Sucking: 11 ways to break the habit without breaking your budget

    The first one is a bit paradoxical: How to become a better programmer by not programming? The answer is to become passionate about your users, about your business. Nothing could be farther from the truth. The book ends with a section on things to read, and it's shocking to discover most software developers don't read a single book in a year. While the book was mostly a enjoyable and enlightening read, some of the posts felt more like rants than informative essays.

    Fortunately, there were only a few and the remainder of the material was a no-nonsense wisdom of an industry veteran. The relaxed, conversational writing style was refreshing and kept my attention very well. I would recommend the book to the novice and experienced developer alike. Jun 02, Sundarraj Kaushik rated it really liked it.

    Another nice book of blog entries from Jeff Atwood. First few blogs are about how one should determine at a very early age if one can program or not and should drop out of a programming career if one is not. He speaks about "sheep that can program and goats that cannot program" should be separated out early in the career so that software can become better. Some of the key observations that I liked are "You have to truly believe, as a company, and as peers, that crucial innovations and improvements Another nice book of blog entries from Jeff Atwood. Some of the key observations that I liked are "You have to truly believe, as a company, and as peers, that crucial innovations and improvements can come from everyone at the company at any time, in bottom-up fashion - they aren't delivered from on high at scheduled release intervals in the almighty master plan.

    In another blog he speaks about how important it is to persuade others to do something. He refers to a set of dialog from the movie based on Idi Amin. Idi Amin is speaking to his trusted aide a Scottish Doctor. Idi Amin: I want you to tell me what to do! Garrigan: "You want me to tell you what to do? Amin: Yes You are my advisor. You are the only one I can trust here.

    You should have told me not to throw the Asians out in the first place! Garrigan: I did! Amit: But you did not persuade me, Nicholas. You did not persuade me! Not a very atypical dialog one is likely to have with either one's manager or client. It is worth doing because, well it is worth doing. The journey of the project should be its own reward regardless of whatever happens to lie at the end of that journey.

    Execute the project to the best of the abilities, learn along the way and if for some reason beyond your control the project fails or does not see the light of the day, so be it. This means [among other things] abolishment of annual or merit rating and management by objectives. They are left gasping. What the hell are we supposed to do instead? Deming's point is that MBO and its ilk are copouts. By using simplistic extrinsic motivators to goad performance, managers excuse themselves from harder matters such as investment, direct personal motivation, thoughtful team formation, staff retention, and ongoing analysis and redesign of work procedures.

    Our point here is somewhat more limited: Any action that rewards team members differentially is likely to foster competition. Managers need to take steps to decrease or counteract this effect. The latter was far more superior to the former, but the fighter pilots preferred the former. The difference was that F had Hydraulic flight controller compared to the manual flight controller of MIG This meant that each maneuver increased the fatigue of the MIG pilot even though he might have out-maneuvered the F pilot. The F could maneuver quicker as compare to the MIG as he was less fatigued and this tilted the pilots to favour F despite its limited abilities.

    Jeff calls this the Boyd's Law of Iteration which states "Speed of iteration beats quality of iteration".

    Jeff argues the same is true for software development. Although he says in other places that quality cannot be sacrificed beyond a point. There is a whole set of blogs in User Interface and Usability. He speaks about the Fitts law which states "Put all commonly accessed UI elements on the edges of screen. Because the cursor automatically stops at the edges, they will be easier to click on. Make clickable areas as large as you can.

    Larger targets are easier to click on".

    How to stop a child's thumb-sucking habit

    One should not ignore the corollary of rule which would read "Make all the clicks that the user must be kept safe from as difficult as possible". Jeff refers to this principle as the "seat ejector" button. This button should be easy to find in an emergency, but should not be place such that the pilot ends up turning this on instead of the navigation lights. Buttons like delete all my mails and such should be available, but should be placed such that the no user would click it by mistake.



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